Climate Change Agreement World

But climate change is a global challenge that does not respect national borders. Emissions everywhere affect people everywhere. This is a subject that requires solutions that need to be coordinated at the international level, and it requires international cooperation to help developing countries move towards a low-carbon economy. The Paris Agreement is a bridge between current policy and climate neutrality before the end of the century. The Paris Agreement was inaugurated at signing on 22 April 2016 (Earth Day) at a ceremony in New York. [59] Following the ratification of the agreement by several European Union states in October 2016, there have been enough countries that have ratified the agreement to produce enough greenhouse gases worldwide for it to enter into force. [60] The agreement entered into force on November 4, 2016. [2] Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the world today. It is responsible for the increase in extreme weather events as well as an uninterrupted series of warmest years since records began. Indeed, for a decade, environmental concerns and the threat posed by climate change have been a unique feature of the World Economic Forum`s Global Risk Report. The Kyoto Protocol, a pioneering environmental agreement adopted at COP3 in Japan in 1997, is the first time that nations have agreed on legal country-specific emission reduction targets.

The protocol, which only entered into force in 2005, set binding emission reduction targets only for industrialized countries, arguing that they were responsible for most of the world`s high greenhouse gas emissions. The United States initially signed the agreement, but never ratified it; President George W. Bush argued that the deal would hurt the U.S. economy because developing countries like China and India would not be involved. The resulting agreement is expected to be adopted in 2015. [62] Through the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement, countries have agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere continues to increase and warm the planet at an alarming rate. Scientists warn that if this warming continues unabated, it could lead to an ecological catastrophe for much of the world, including stunning sea-level rise, record droughts and floods, as well as widespread loss of species. . . .